Associations between viral and bacterial potencial pathogens in the nasopharynx of children with and without respiratory symptoms

Doctoral Dissertation uoadl:1958500 90 Read counter

Unit:
Τομέας Υγείας - Μητέρας - Παιδιού
Library of the School of Health Sciences
Deposit date:
2017-10-04
Year:
2017
Author:
Tsialta Paraskevi
Dissertation committee:
• Μαρίζα Τσολιά, Καθηγήτρια, Ιατρική, ΕΚΠΑ
• Νικόλαος Παπαδόπουλος, Καθηγητής , Ιατρική, ΕΚΠΑ
• Βασιλική Παπαευαγγέλου, Καθηγήτρια , Ιατρική, ΕΚΠΑ
• Νικόλαος Σπυρίδης, Επίκουρος Καθηγητής , Ιατρική, ΕΚΠΑ
• Ξεπαπαδάκη Παρασκευή, Επίκουρη Καθηγήτρια , Ιατρική, ΕΚΠΑ
• Γαρούφη Αναστασία, Αναπληρώτρια Καθηγήτρια , Ιατρική, ΕΚΠΑ
• Μίχος Αθανάσιος, Επίκουρος Καθηγητής , Ιατρική, ΕΚΠΑ
Original Title:
Επίδραση των ιογενών λοιμώξεων του αναπνευστικού στο βακτηριακό αποικισμό του ρινοφάρυγγα σε παιδιά
Languages:
Greek
Translated title:
Associations between viral and bacterial potencial pathogens in the nasopharynx of children with and without respiratory symptoms
Summary:
ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN VIRAL AND BACTERIAL POTENCIAL PATHOGENS IN THE NASOPHARYNX OF CHILDREN WITH AND WITHOUT RESPIRATORY SYMPTOMS
Abstract
Background: Nasopharyngeal bacterial colonization is necessary for subsequent respiratory and/or invasive infection. Our study aimed at comparing nasopharyngeal bacterial colonization rates between children with and without symptoms of an acute viral respiratory tract infection (ARTI) and examining associations between identified microorganisms.
Methods: Children 3 months to 6 years of age with and without an acute viral respiratory tract infection were recruited and a questionnaire was filled. Nasopharyngeal samples were examined for Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), Haemophilus influenzae (HI), Moraxella catarrhalis (MC), Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and Streptococcus pyogenes (SPyo) by culture. Viruses were detected with polymerase chain reaction (PCR).
Results: Median age of the 386 recruited children (216 males) was 23.4 months, and 127 had no respiratory symptoms. More asymptomatic subjects were found negative for all bacteria tested (p<0.01). S. pneumoniae (p<0.01), M. catarrhalis (p=0.001) and mixed bacterial colonization patterns were more frequent among symptomatic children (p<0.05). Colonization of symptomatic, virus-positive children with M. catarrhalis was higher than in asymptomatic and/or virus-negative children (p=0.005). The highest H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis colonization rates were recorded in association with influenza virus (IFV). A strongly negative association between S. pneumoniae and S. aureus, a higher rate of H. influenzae detection among S. pneumoniae colonized children, and an increased likelihood of M. catarrhalis detection in the presence of H. influenzae were observed. H. influenzae colonization was more likely in the presence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and M. catarrhalis colonization was associated with rhinovirus (RV) detection.
Conclusions: Viruses are associated with different nasopharyngeal bacterial colonization patterns. Observed pathogens’ associations may play a role in disease, and continuous surveillance is required to follow possible effects of interventions such as vaccines.
Main subject category:
Health Sciences
Keywords:
Bacteria, Children, Nasopharyngeal colonization, Respiratory tract infections, Respiratory viruses
Index:
No
Number of index pages:
0
Contains images:
Yes
Number of references:
114
Number of pages:
74
ΔΙΑΤΡΙΒΗ 02-2017.pdf (1 MB) Open in new window