Can memory mixing account for the time estimation differences between auditory and visual intervals?

Postgraduate Thesis uoadl:2767972 139 Read counter

Unit:
Κατεύθυνση Γνωσιακή Επιστήμη
Library of the School of Science
Deposit date:
2018-06-06
Year:
2018
Author:
Zampraka Dimitra
Supervisors info:
Αργυρώ Βατάκη, Ερευνήτρια, Ινστιτούτο Γνωσιακής Έρευνας και Τεχνολογίας
Αθανάσιος Πρωτόπαπας, Professor, Department of Special Needs Education, University of Oslo
Κωνσταντίνος Μουτούσης, Αναπληρωτής Καθηγητής, Τμήμα Ιστορίας και Φιλοσοφίας της Επιστήμης, ΕΚΠΑ
Original Title:
Can memory mixing account for the time estimation differences between auditory and visual intervals?
Languages:
English
Translated title:
Can memory mixing account for the time estimation differences between auditory and visual intervals?
Summary:
Previous studies have shown that there is a subjective difference in duration perception of short auditory and visual intervals of the same physical duration: auditory intervals are overestimated compared to visual intervals and vice versa. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the memory mixing hypothesis can account for this difference. According to the memory mixing theory the emergence of the auditory-visual modality difference requires that both modalities are present in a timing event, because their respective differences can only be manifested when they are compared against each other through the use of a common representation, to the formation of which both contribute. In order to test for this hypothesis we conducted a duration discrimination task and a duration reproduction task using auditory, visual and audiovisual intervals and two different sets of durations. Results for the duration discrimination task revealed an asymmetric effect: when audiovisual intervals were used as reference intervals for comparisons there was a significant difference between the perceived duration of visual and auditory and audiovisual comparison intervals which was not present when auditory and visual intervals were used as reference intervals. Results for the reproduction task failed to show any robust effects. The finding of the aforementioned asymmetric effect offers support to an auditory dominant memory mixing theory using a new experimental design.
Main subject category:
Science
Other subject categories:
Philosophy - Psychology
Keywords:
time estimation, memory mixing, auditory dominance, auditory, visual, audiovisual, modality
Index:
No
Number of index pages:
0
Contains images:
Yes
Number of references:
16
Number of pages:
27

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