Stereotypical interpretations of the female gender and how they shape the political scene of the Tudor dynasty. The examples of Mary and Elizabeth Tudor.

Postgraduate Thesis uoadl:2883534 131 Read counter

Unit:
Κατεύθυνση Ευρωπαϊκή ιστορία
Library of the School of Philosophy
Deposit date:
2019-10-24
Year:
2019
Author:
Sotiropoulou Theodora
Supervisors info:
Γαγανάκης Κώστας, Αναπληρωτής καθηγητής Νεότερης Ευρωπαϊκής Ιστορίας (16ος – 18ος αιώνας), Τμήμα Ιστορίας και Αρχαιολογίας, Φιλοσοφική Σχολή Αθηνών
Γιαντσή Νικολέττα, Αναπληρώτρια καθηγήτρια Ευρωπαϊκής Μεσαιωνικής Ιστορίας, Τμήμα Ιστορίας και Αρχαιολογίας, Φιλοσοφική Σχολή Αθηνών
Παπαθανασίου Μαρία, Aναπληρώτρια καθηγήτρια Νεότερης Ευρωπαϊκής Ιστορίας, Τμήμα Ιστορίας και Αρχαιολογίας, Φιλοσοφική Σχολή Αθηνών
Original Title:
Στερεοτυπικές αποδόσεις του γυναικείου φύλου και πώς αυτές διαμορφώνουν την πολιτική σκηνή της δυναστείας των Τυδώρ. Τα παραδείγματα της Μαρίας και Ελισάβετ Τυδώρ.
Languages:
Greek
Translated title:
Stereotypical interpretations of the female gender and how they shape the political scene of the Tudor dynasty. The examples of Mary and Elizabeth Tudor.
Summary:
The Tudor dynasty even though had been in power only for three generations, its influence and impact was strong. It offers us an unparalleled opportunity to study the intersections of power, gender and ideology of the sexes. The first king of the dynasty, Henry VII, conquered the throne at a time when the peaceful succession to power was something unusual in English history. At the beginning of the 16th century, the strong and uninterrupted tradition of male succession was halted by the rise of two women on the throne of England.
In Western Europe, reign was a male affair. Historians examining biographies observed a recurring pattern. The power passed through the hands of one man in the hands of the other (from grandfather to grandson, from father to son or nephew) excluding for centuries women from positions of power. The men who ruled thought that female domination was a threat to their authority and to the social order. For 400 years the political scene of England was monopolized by men, but in 1553 on the throne rose a woman, Maria Tudor. Maria was succeeded by her sister Elizabeth and this "Gynocracy" in England lasted 50 years. The rise of not one but two women on the throne of England terrorized many, like the Protestant John Knox, who in his text "The First Blast of the Trumpet Against the Monstrous Regiment of Women" was sharply criticise the possession of the throne by women. He considered the female monarchy as something unheard and unnatural. In his work he found many supporters, who like him they identified them with the biblical Jezebel, but many of his opponents did not share his aversion to women power.
However, the common attributes of the two women, who broke the barrier of the male monarchy, was that they managed to masterfully integrate their gender into the monarchy rhetoric. Their quick reactions, military and leadership capabilities and their rhetoric, their ability to inspire confidence in the English, have played a very important role in their monarchy. These two women showed early their skills and managed to pass the obstacles of their sex. They were both the rightful heirs of the throne and with their competent governance they managed their sex not to be considered as problem for the legitimacy of their monarchy. And even though the female reign was treated as an anomaly, they managed to change the landscape of European politics forever.
Main subject category:
History
Keywords:
Tudor, gender, women, woman' s political power, Gynocracy, Mary Tudor, Elizabeth Tudor
Index:
No
Number of index pages:
0
Contains images:
Yes
Number of references:
619
Number of pages:
107
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