The role of hypothalamic inflammation in diet-induced obesity and its association with cognitive and mood disorders

Postgraduate Thesis uoadl:2942595 12 Read counter

Unit:
Κατεύθυνση Έρευνα στην Γυναικεία Αναπαραγωγή
Library of the School of Health Sciences
Deposit date:
2021-04-07
Year:
2021
Author:
Dionysopoulou Sofia
Supervisors info:
Γεώργιος Μαστοράκος, Καθηγητής, Ιατρική Σχολή, ΕΚΠΑ
Ευαγγελία Χαρμανδάρη, Καθηγήτρια, Ιατρική Σχολή, ΕΚΠΑ
Γεώργιος Βαλσαμάκης, Διδάκτωρ, Ιατρική Σχολή, ΕΚΠΑ
Original Title:
The role of hypothalamic inflammation in diet-induced obesity and its association with cognitive and mood disorders
Languages:
Greek
Translated title:
The role of hypothalamic inflammation in diet-induced obesity and its association with cognitive and mood disorders
Summary:
The prevalence of obesity has been increasing during the last decades. Moreover, epidemiological studies have shown that obesity often coexist with cognitive and mood disorders. It is known that obesity is characterized by low-grade inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that high-fat diet and obesity may cause hypothalamic inflammation. The aim of this review is to summarize the evidence regarding the possible physiopathologic relationship between diet- and/or obesity-induced hypothalamic inflammation with cognitive and mood disorders. Inflammation may influence hypothalamic inter-connections with regions important for cognition and mood while it may cause dysregulation of the Hypothalamus Pituitary Adrenal axis and influence monoaminergic systems. Exercise, healthy diet and glucagon-like peptide receptor agonists, which can reduce hypothalamic inflammation in obese models, could improve the deleterious effects on cognition and mood.
Main subject category:
Health Sciences
Keywords:
Diet, Obesity, Hypothalamic inflammation, Cognitive disorders, Mood disorders, Dementia, Depression
Index:
No
Number of index pages:
0
Contains images:
Yes
Number of references:
204
Number of pages:
38

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