The contribution of constructions to dialogicity and discourse unit delimitation: A corpus-based analysis of Believe (you) me, Believe it or not, Think again, and Mind you

Doctoral Dissertation uoadl:2946716 10 Read counter

Unit:
Department of English Language and Literature
Library of the School of Philosophy
Deposit date:
2021-06-09
Year:
2021
Author:
Geka Vassiliki
Dissertation committee:
Βασιλική Νικηφορίδου - Καθηγήτρια - Τμήμα Αγγλικής Γλώσσας και Φιλολογίας- ΕΚΠΑ (αντικατέστησε την κα. Μαρμαρίδου στην 7μελη λόγω αφυπηρέτησης)
Έλλη Υφαντίδου - Καθηγήτρια - Τμήμα Αγγλικής Γλώσσας και Φιλολογίας - ΕΚΠΑ
Αγγελική Τζάννε - Αναπληρώτρια Καθηγήτρια - Τμήμα Αγγλικής Γλώσσας και Φιλολογίας - ΕΚΠΑ
Γεώργιος Μικρός - Καθηγητής - Τμήμα Ιταλικής Γλώσσας και Φιλολογίας - ΕΚΠΑ
Διονύσης Γούτσος - Καθηγητής - Τμήμα Φιλολογίας - ΕΚΠΑ
Ελένη Παναρέτου - Αναπληρώτρια Καθηγήτρια - Τμήμα Φιλολογίας - ΕΚΠΑ
Αθανασιάδου Αγγελική - Καθηγήτρια - Τμήμα Αγγλικής Γλώσσας και Φιλολογίας- ΑΠΘ
Original Title:
The contribution of constructions to dialogicity and discourse unit delimitation: A corpus-based analysis of Believe (you) me, Believe it or not, Think again, and Mind you
Languages:
English
Translated title:
The contribution of constructions to dialogicity and discourse unit delimitation: A corpus-based analysis of Believe (you) me, Believe it or not, Think again, and Mind you
Summary:
Motivated by the growing scholarly interest in the fields of dialogicity, intersubjectivity, and conventionalised discourse phenomena, the present doctoral dissertation provides a Construction Grammar (CxG) account of the patterns Believe (you) me, Believe it or not, Think again and Mind you. Its aim is to establish their constructional status in the language and empirically ascertain that they form part of a well-entrenched, constructional network of dialogic perspectivisation motivated by mental state verbs in the Imperative (including sub-constructions of the latter). To fulfill its aim, the research relies on synchronic, corpus-derived (BNC & COCA) data examined through a composite, methodological framework that combines qualitative and quantitative parameters. Adopting this empirically-grounded research design, and following random sampling practices, the study subjects its data to systematic tagging, encompassing considerations related to internal and external (i.e., contextual and discourse) features. To secure representativeness and falsifiability, the annotated data are correlated with frequency counts which are then measured in terms of statistical significance and internal reliability. Supported by the above, the dissertation argues against the treatment of its objects of study as mere idiomatic expressions or patterns whose meaning is exhausted compositionally. Rather, it confirms that although they retain their respective degrees of specificity and non-compositionality, they also relate to other more productive constructions in the language, as suggested by their observable similarities, i.e., their shared Imperative morphology and their common semantic anchoring to mental state verbs. In this context, the study further provides a comprehensive account of the syntactic, semantic-pragmatic and discourse properties of the constructions by teasing them apart into inherited and idiosyncratic ones. In so doing, the research reveals that the use of the constructions in discourse invites certain contextual regularities (e.g., increased co-occurrence with negative and positive lexical prosody, intensifying and stance-encoding elements etc.,) and interdependencies. Focusing on the latter, the research casts light on the dialogic, regulatory discourse scope of the constructions which endows them with the ability to mark discourse ‘boundaries’, despite the inherent fluidity and incrementalism of discourse flow. In this respect, the study initiates a novel line of investigation concerning discourse structure segmentation approaches and contributes empirical insights into the specifiable, internal ‘architecture’ of constructionally delimited discourse units. This finding allows the study to further entertain the hypothesis that the function of the constructions in discourse bears certain similarities to the function of discourse markers. Integrating all the above, the research documents the presence of a well-entrenched, constructional network of dialogic perspectivisation, ranging from maximal to minimal negotiation of viewpoints, systematically motivated by the Imperative and the use of mental state verbs. It further reveals that this particular network situates itself within an even broader dialogic schema, crucially residing in the productivity of the licensing schemas of the constructions examined and the Imperative. In unveiling this, the study invites further research into the Imperative and its ability to motivate dialogicity and gradience of (non-)compositionality (i.e., idiomaticity) in the patterns inheriting it. Finally, the findings of the study pave the way for future, interdisciplinary research in the recently opened, but already productive, investigation of discourse-level constructions that crucially extends to issues concerning discourse unit delimitation and the categorial features of discourse markers.
Main subject category:
Language – Literature
Keywords:
Construction Grammar, dialogicity, perspectivisation, discourse unit delimitation, discourse markers, corpora, mental state verbs, Imperative
Index:
No
Number of index pages:
0
Contains images:
Yes
Number of references:
498
Number of pages:
444

Dissertation_final manuscript_Geka Vassiliki.pdf
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